Ombraz Dolomite Armless Sunglasses Review

Ombraz Dolomite Overview

If you prefer a healthy dose of innovation when it comes to your outdoor gear, Ombraz will surprise you. Meant to change the core nature of sunglasses, the company has built a pair of shades that does away with sidearms. Yes, the things that once kept sunglasses fixed to your face are no more.

The Ombraz Dolomite sunglasses are the round style of the brand’s unique design, which replaces said sidearms with a sturdy, soft, flexible cord. The cord is corded through eyelets in the frame — where sidearms would normally go — and has an adjustable pull design to easily tighten and loosen it around your head

Is it weird? A little bit, at first. Does it work? Extremely well. The Ombraz design, which removes the most breakable part of sunglasses, not only increases the lifespan of your favorite eyewear, but it lightens them, keeps them from falling off your head, and makes storage a breeze.

Ombraz Dolomite Star Rating
  • Lens
  • Frame
  • Comfort
  • Coverage
  • Durability
  • Style
4.6

Summary

The Ombraz Dolomite sunglasses give you ample sun protection with premium materials, wide coverage, and striking style. They weigh almost nothing and don’t have any sidearms, the biggest leap in sunglasses since polarization. Strap them on, forget they’re on your face, and hit the trail.

In every other way, the Ombraz Dolomite (and all three Ombraz style of sunglasses) are premium outdoor eyewear. They feature three lens colors, two frame colors, non-polarized and blue light-blocker options, and are made with impressive materials, including Zeiss optic lenses, a neoprene case, and lifetime warranty on the cord and frames. Plus, the Ombraz Shade project plants 20 trees for each pair of sunglasses sold, helping to re-green (and re-carbon) the environment.

Check out the full review of the Ombraz Dolomite, better known as the armless sunglasses, below.

Ombraz Dolomite Specifications

Feature Type Feature Specs What This Means
Weight .9 (25 g) Extremely lightweight, and without arms they feel like nothing.
Activity Outdoor, Watersports, Snowsports The Dolomites work well for any outdoor activity where your hands are free, or you need to wear them for long stretches.
Polarized Yes Crystal clear sun protection.
UV Protection 100% UVA/UVB Full coverage.
Fit Large, Narrow/Medium Dolomites come in two sizes.
Lens Material Zeiss Optics High quality, German-engineered with hard coating and smudge resistance.
Frame Material Hard-carved cellulose acetate High quality plant-based frames.
Case Included? Neoprene + Cloth 3.5 mm thick neoprene case plus attached microfiber cloth for secure storage.
Prescription? Yes Ombraz offers prescription versions through a partner company.
Sustainability Ombraz Shade Project Ombraz plants 20 trees for every pair sold.
Manufacturer Warranty Limited Lifetime (on cord and frame) Without sidearms, these are less likely to break, but the frame and cord have a lifetime warranty, so get in touch if they do. Frames are not covered, but can be replaced for a cost.
Retail Price $140 A premium price for well-made sunglasses. You’re paying for innovation, quality construction, and style.

Gear Review of the Ombraz Dolomite

The Ombraz Dolomite sunglasses come in an unassuming recyclable box that belies the high quality, protective shades inside. You’ll find them snug in their neoprene case, which provides excellent padding, and because there are no arms, they slide in and out with ease. The case even has an attached cleaning cloth to keep them looking fresh.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-with-case

The Ombraz Dolomite armless sunglasses.

The first I noticed was the weight. My digital scale puts them at .9 oz, and they felt like air in my hand and when worn. While sunglasses aren’t the heaviest item, when you’re hitting the trail every little bit counts. You will wear these on your face or around your neck and hiking mile after mile in a heavier pair does become noticeable.

The Ombraz Dolimites are truly featherweight for such a durable pair of glasses, in part because of their plant-based cellulose acetate frames — and of course because they have no sidearms.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-on-wood-stump

A cord in lieu of sidearms. Crazy, huh?

I put them to use for a few months, from long day hikes on trails in Ojai, California to extended beach days on the Southern California coastline. The extra-wide frames wrapped and curved around the sides of my eyeline, blocking sun with side visors and providing a large polarized view. The lens tint is pretty heavy (I tested the Polarized Grey version, which is the darkest), but in the bright California sun this was ideal. The color of the blue sky and water was actually enhanced, while the glare was significantly reduced, and anything bright green took on a spectral quality.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-worn-straight-on

Wide coverage, solid style, and very hard to break.

Then, of course, there’s the cord in lieu of sidearms. Put simply, it works. In fact, it solves many problems that most sunglasses are riddled with, mostly with durability and storage, and does so with an elegant solution that lives up to the hype.

The Ombraz cord is supple yet durable in hand, adjusts with ease, and is easy to custom fit to any head (or any new hat or hair style). It takes just a second or two to adjust then stays in place, as do the sunglasses, no matter how vigorously you move. The Ombraz sunglasses cord feels best when slightly loose.

Overall the sunglasses do take getting used to — they sit on your face differently than regular shades — and wearing them too tight will be uncomfortable.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-strap-worn

Sidearms? No thanks. Ombraz is all about the cord.

For hiking and backpacking, there isn’t really a better solution. The sunglasses can stow on the chest or head easily, but when hiking for long days in sun you typically just want them to stay on your face in whatever direction you look. The Ombraz Dolomites do this when you’ve got a pack strapped on and miles in front of you.

Lens – 5 Stars

For the price, I found the Ombraz Dolomite lenses to be excellent. The amount of clarity, protection, and glare reduction I found while using them in bright sun is as good as any sunglasses I’ve worn. I also appreciate the size of the lens, as it covered my full vision.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-lenses-and-nose-pads

The Dolomite lenses are polarized, heavily tinted, and a joy to watch the world through.

The Ombraz Dolomites use Zeiss optics, are hard-coated to prevent scratches, and have 100% UVA and UVB protection. I found them easy to clean, and so far they have not scratched or had any durability issues. They do fog up a little when wearing a mask, but it clears quickly and hopefully we’ll be out of the mask woods soon.

Frame – 4.5 Stars

The Ombraz Dolomite frames are excellent, especially for outdoor folks with a strong sense of style. They are large frames (I tested the Narrow/Regular version and even those were rather big) that cover the bulk of your face, and they have a distinctively thick bridge.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-close-up-worn

High quality frames that feel rugged yet refined.

The nose pads feel pretty good and the frame itself is very, very light, which I love and is ideal for backpacking. They feel good in hand (and on face), and come in aesthetically pleasing colors (I tested the Slate colorway).

I’m subtracting a half star due to the size — they should offer a bigger range for different face sizes, as I can see this being much too large for some people.

Comfort – 4 Stars

The Ombraz Dolomites are very comfortable for one simple reason: the frames are crazy light. The large nose pads paired with the cord lock them on your face, and it doesn’t feel like you’re wearing anything.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-strap-worn-2-smiling

Surprisingly comfortable.

I’m subtracting a star because while the nose pads do secure the sunglasses in place very well, after wearing them for a while I do notice indents on the bridge of my nose, and a bit of pressure. Also, depending on the angle, the sunglasses can end up lopsided on your face. This is quickly adjusted, but is due to the cord not having any weight to help keep it even.

For anyone that feels they’re not comfortable because they’re “too tight:” the Ombraz style is meant to be worn loose. They are not comfortable when pulled tight against the head, so don’t expect them to be.

Coverage – 5 Stars

Beyond the weight and lack of sidearms, what really sold me on the Ombraz Dolomites was the extra bit of eye protection on the sides, called side visors. The frame gets thick here to house the cord, but it doubles as sun protection, a bit like goggles would. It’s a smart design that makes it feel like a true outdoor product.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-tilted-worn

Extra wide coverage, including side visors.

Durability – 5 Stars

Ombraz was created to increase the overall durability of sunglasses. The sidearms are the most commonly fragile element in sunglasses, and the brand does away with them entirely. This means you won’t have to tighten tiny screws (or find a tiny screwdriver), worry about crunching them when someone comes in for a tight hug (or when you sit on them), or wonder if they survived in your backpack.

The Ombraz Dolomites sit fairly flat, and the frame is very sturdy. The cord has a lifetime warranty, so if it does break, Ombraz will replace it, though it’s well-made and would only snap if you took a knife to it.

Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-in-case

The inluded Neoprene case greatly reduces scratches and crunching.

The only potential issue with durability is the lens, but Ombraz uses Zeiss for its lenses, and they are quite tough. As with any sunglasses, under enough pressure they can scratch or crack, but in my uses it was never an issue. And you can order new lenses and slip them into the frame yourself.

Style – 4 Stars

Ombraz means shade in Italian, and despite this not being an Italian brand, you can tell from the design that style is important. At first look they felt like designer sunglasses, and still do at times, but after rough use it’s clear they’re more built for the outdoors.

Style will always be subjective, but my rating is for my personal taste and with the outdoor crowd in mind. I think the Dolomite style in particular, which is more circular than the Classic or Leggero styles, is the most flashy that Ombraz has to offer. I’m not in love with the super thick bridge and the shape it creates. Other than this, the lens color, frame color, cord, and general vibe is excellent.

You will turn heads.

Grievances

The Ombraz Dolomite sunglasses’ only real grievances has to do with its most unique feature: the lack of sidearms and inclusion of a cord. It takes some getting used to.

I believe that for hiking and backpacking — any experience where you’re generally hands-free, have miles to crush ahead of you, and need them for endless hours — this design is far superior. You will love them for how durable they are, the lack of any hinges or screws, and the inability to lose them (granted you don’t take them off your neck).

1-Ombraz-Dolomite-Review-strap-closing-1

Two hands are required to adjust the cord, so taking them off your head requires two hands as well.

That said, for activities that require a lot more putting on and taking off, I felt slowed down by the cord. For instance, when driving in and out of sunlight, it was hard to quickly adjust them with one hand. Or with an ever-reaching 6-month-old, it was difficult to put them on, take them off, and keep them out of reach. You also can’t take them off your head without two hands — first to loosen the cord to get it larger than your head, then to take it off entirely — so if you’re trying to fully remove them from your body, you need two hands.

With this in mind I still grab sunglasses with sidearms when I’m doing basic, quick tasks. But when I’m gearing up for a long day in the sun, the Ombraz Dolomites are the perfect pair.

Where to Buy Ombraz Dolomite

We tested the Ombraz Dolomite armless sunglasses in the Slate frame with polarized grey lenses. The sunglasses also come in a Charcoal frame, and in polarized brown or yellow lenses. They also come in two sizes (we tested the Narrow/Medium size).

While this is the only version of the Dolomite, Ombraz’s armless sunglasses also come in two other shapes, the Classic and Leggero.

Compare Ombraz Dolomite prices below.

Daniel Zweier

Daniel Zweier is Editor-in-Chief of Backpackers.com. Beyond orchestrating the daily flow of Backpackers.com, Daniel writes surrealistic short fiction and novels, adventures into the backcountry and abroad, surfs, reads, drinks tea, and obsesses over gear. A lot of gear. Visit his website if you want to learn more about his authorial pursuits.

Review Policy: We do not accept payments or gifts from brands and vendors, and strive to provide unbiased, independent advice. Brands typically provide review samples which we return, and in some cases we purchase the item so we can keep using it long after the review. Affiliate Policy: We support the hours that go into our reviews and testing through affiliate commissions on purchases made through links in this article. These don't effect the outcome of our reviews or selection of gear, as per our Review Policy.

One response to “Ombraz Dolomite Armless Sunglasses Review

  1. Craig Mason-Jonessays:

    These look like great glasses.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *